Where to retire and what to do

13 Jan, 2023

Where to retire and what to do

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Whether you are based in one place or a digital nomad there may come a point to consider retirement. And with that notion of retirement comes the idea of where to retire? Do you want to move somewhere special for retirement, or are you happy travelling a little more, perhaps by housesitting to discover where you would like to end up. Read on to learn our top tips for where to retire and what to do.

6 Tips for where to retire and what to do

Daydreaming of retirement near a fabulous beach?

Choosing a place to retire is a major and exciting decision. There are certain places around the country that a lot of retirees prefer. One example is the Hilton Head, South Carolina area, which has communities specifically geared toward the needs of retirees, like the Sun City community

If you aren’t sure where to start, the following are some tips to help you choose the right retirement location for you. 

Cost of living

When you retire, you’re going to be on a fixed income, making the cost of living of a location a huge factor when you’re deciding where to live. A lot of people opt to move to lower-cost-of-living places in the south and the Sun Belt when they retire. 

You want to think about all of the factors that are involved in the cost of living. For example, you want to consider not just housing costs but also the cost of things like groceries, gas, and going to restaurants or whatever else you typically do. 

You might find that a place with lower taxes has a higher price tag for everyday items because the sales tax is more. 

You’re also going to have to look at healthcare costs. Even if you have Medicare, you have to consider that the cost of certain treatments and medications isn’t covered. 

Taxes

We briefly touched on taxes, but it’s a big one for retirees. 

If a state has a high income tax, they usually don’t tax Social Security in retirement, so it could change your current situation. 

There are also seven states that don’t have an income tax—Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, and Wyoming. Tennessee and New Hampshire similarly don’t have state income taxes on earned wages, but they do tax investment interest and income. 

Climate 

There tends to be an automatic assumption that everyone wants to retire to somewhere warm and sunny, but is that the right choice for you? Florida is too hot and humid for some retirees, and they don’t like the idea of not having four seasons, so they opt for someone like North or South Carolina, with a milder and more seasonal climate. 

You want a climate that’s going to facilitate doing the things you like doing and one that’s going to help you stay active. 

Family proximity

You want to think about logistically how easy or difficult it will be for your children and family members to reach you, depending on where you retire from. If you see your family a lot, maybe somewhere within a few hours’ drive is ideal. 

It could be that you opt to retire somewhere close to a major airport that could make traveling simpler. 

You might also want to be near an airport if you plan to spend your time traveling a lot in retirement. 

Quality of life

Quality of life is a term that has a different meaning for everyone, but you really have to assess what you’re interested in and what is a high quality of life from your personal perspective. For example, maybe spending time on the beach is what you think of as a great quality of life. For other people, it might be the chance to golf or play tennis, or maybe your biggest focus is on being able to meet other active retirees and socialize. 

Some people want to live in a quiet, tranquil place without a lot of other people around them, while other retirees want to spend their time at clubs or parties. It’s all about personal taste. 

Give the contenders a trial run

You might have a location in mind that seems wonderful, but the reality turns out that it isn’t right for you. That can and does happen, and if you were to find yourself in that situation, you’re either going to have to deal with a place you don’t love or you’ll have to again sell your home and move

Rather than finding yourself in this situation, spend at least several weeks in your main contenders, if not more. Find a short-term rental that’s as close to the type of home and the community you could see yourself living in. 

Give yourself a chance to interact with other people in the area, go to restaurants, shop at grocery stores, and spend time outside. Learn what people love about the area and what they don’t. 

You’ll start to increasingly figure out during this time what you value the most, even if you aren’t completely sure, as you go into your search for the perfect retirement location. 

 

Regarding what to do in retirement

where to retire
Glenn an early retiree and one of our housesitters with two dogs

If you can’t quite decide where to move in retirement then why not try housesitting to test a location you like. Becoming a housesitter means you have a responsibility to care for the homeowner’s pets and property, however you get to live in the home for free. So as an exchange of services or a barter, it allows you to test a new location at very little cost. Perhaps you imagine yourself doing something active with the ability to travel. Then housesitting might be just the ticket.

 

Click here to Join as a trusted house sitter

 

Further reading about housesitting

At Housesitmatch.com we like to share useful blogs and practical advice about housesitters, housesitting and pet sitting. We hope you find this small selection of our blogs on house sitters and house sitting in London useful.

How to get started as a housesitter

How to travel on a budget – A housesitter’s tips

Budget travel guide Budapest – Housesitting

Cat sitting tourist sees London for free

What a housesitter does – Top 10 responsibilities

Top 10 tips for catsitting

Top dogsitting tips for beginners

 


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LamiaW

LamiaW

Founder and Director of HouseSitMatch - I'm a hands-on Admin on the site. Please ask any questions and as soon as I can I'll happily answer and assist where I can.

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